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The College of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica’s exercise physiology program is housed in the state-of-the-art Burns Wellness Commons, a vibrant, busy academic and fitness center featuring all of the latest exercise machines, indoor running tracks and a rock wall.

You’ll learn from our outstanding faculty members, who bring their real-world experience and passion to the classroom. Your small class sizes will give you a chance to build relationships with your instructors and classmates.

Outside the classroom, St. Scholastica’s Cenergy! Wellness coaching program gives you the perfect opportunity to gain experience in honing your craft through volunteer work or an internship. You’ll emerge from the exercise physiology program well prepared to attend graduate school or to start work right away in a variety of areas, including fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, corporate wellness and more.

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Benedictine Scholarship

All new first-year applicants to St. Scholastica will be awarded either the Benedictine Scholarship or the Access Award, upon admission to the College.

Financial Aid

100% of traditional incoming undergraduates receive some type of financial aid. The average for scholarships, grants and/or loans is $31,841.

Degree Details

Tuition

Are You Looking for a Face-to-Face (on-campus) Experience?

St. Scholastica’s longstanding commitment to inclusivity and generous financial aid packages make our world-class educational programs accessible to students from any background.

Curriculum

Here are some classes you could take as part of this major or minor. Be sure to create your course plan in consultation with your advisor.

Coursework

BIO 1036 – Biology of the Cell

Introduces cell biology, intended for students who are not majoring in the natural sciences. Topics include the study of structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; study of the structure, function and behavior of cells; an introduction to cellular metabolism. 2 class hours.

CHM 1040 – General, Organic, and Biochemistry for Health Sciences

Introduces concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry in an integrated rather than a sequential order. Topics include the structure and function of atoms, ions and compounds, the periodic table, organic functional groups, biological macromolecules, and an introduction to metabolism. This course is required for Nursing majors and can be applied to the Exercise Physiology major.

CHM 1110 – General Chemistry I

Introduces atomic and molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, gas laws, chemical periodicity, and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: high school chemistry

CHM 1120 – General Chemistry II

Studies solutions, equilibria, coordination chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, nuclear chemistry, and qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: C- or higher in CHM 1110.

EXP 3322 – Biomechanics

Explores fundamental principles, calculations and applications of biomechanical analysis to the human body at rest and during movement. Special attention is given to the relationship of biomechanics to kinesiology and exercise physiology in order to understand the role of physical stressors as they influence significant clinical changes in the body.

EXP 3323 – Sports Nutrition

Studies structure, function and dietary sources of macro and micronutruients. Determination of individual nutrient requirements and diet analysis. Effect of nutrition and hydration on health and athletic performance. Efficacy and ethical considerations regarding the use of nutritional manipulation techniques, supplements and ergogenic aids to improve performance and enhance recovery. Prerequisite: CHM 1040.

EXP 3331 – Exercise Physiology

Studies basic principles of human physiology and metabolic processes used to produce and store energy with direct application to acute and chronic exercise. Structure, function and measurement of the cardiovascular, pulmonary and neuromuscular systems with respect to human activity and athletic performance. Measurement of hemodynamic parameters and expired ventilatory gases to determine energy expenditure at rest and during exercise.

EXP 3332 – Physiological Assessment

Explores basic to advanced instrumentation used to evaluate aerobic capacity, flexibility, body composition, muscular strength and endurance. Pre-exercise screening, safety and legal ramifications of exercise as a therapeutic intervention. Physiological adaptation in response to acute and chronic exercise and its application to exercise prescription and training for athletic performance. Administration and application of various stress test protocols and exercise programs in developing individualized exercise prescriptions for healthy and diseased individuals. Effect of exercise on the treatment and progression of common lifestyle diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 2120.

EXP 3334 – Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation

Studies multi-disciplinary risk factors considered responsible for heart and vascular disease along with commonly associated diseases (obesity, diabetes) and behaviors (smoking, physical inactivity). Changes in cardiac structure, function and coronary circulation that occur in heart and vascular disease. Behavioral, surgical and pharmacological treatments used in primary and secondary prevention of heart disease. Use of diagnostic techniques to determine safe and effective exercise prescription for cardiac and pulmonary patients. Recognition of, and response to, common psychosocial issues as they relate to the post-myocardial infarction and pulmonary patients.

EXP 3342 – Strength Training & Conditioni

Scientific theory and practical application of strength training and aerobic exercise to enhance the function and capacity of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems.

EXP 4431 – Advanced Exercise Physiology

Integrates undergraduate exercise physiology classroom and laboratory experiences to illustrate how the understanding of the physiology of exercise, sport, and physical activity is applied in real world settings within the scope of practice of an exercise physiologist. Laboratory sessions focus on physical/physiological measurement and evaluation techniques while the lecture portion is centered on applied exercise physiology topics and professional development.

EXP 4436 – Exercise Physiology Research I

Foundations of research including the fundamental tenets of scientific investigation and the scientific method; the importance of objectivity and ethical behavior in research; and the ability to critically read, interpret, and discuss the content of scientific articles. The skills involved in writing a research paper according to specified guidelines will also be taught and will culminate in the writing of a research paper.

EXP 4438 – Exercise Electrocardiography and Graded Exercise Testing

Students read electrocardiograms of individuals at rest and during exercise with special attention paid to the electrocardiograms of post-myocardial infarction patients in cardiac rehabilitation programs. Includes cardiac medications and graded exercise testing. Prerequisite: EXP 3334.

EXP 4555 – Internship

A supervised off-campus internship that allows the student to apply theoretical knowledge and hands-on laboratory skills to real-life situations. Prerequisites: EXP major and consent of the chair.

HSC 2209 – Medical Terminology

Studies the terminology common to medicine utilizing word elements (prefixes, suffixes and roots) basic for building medical terms and analyzing meanings using a programmed learning format; includes spelling and pronunciation of medical terms.

PSC 2001 – Physics I

Covers algebra-based general physics including Newtonian mechanics (motion, force, energy, momentum), harmonic motion, fluids, and thermodynamics. Students must have ease and familiarity with basic algebraic and trigonometric techniques. Includes one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A grade of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better in College Algebra (MATH 1111) or a C or better in a more advanced college math course or a math ACT score of 24 or higher or by permission of the instructor.

PSC 2002 – Physics II

Continues the study of algebra-based general physics including content in electricity and magnetism, geometric optics, sound and light waves, and selected topics in modern physics. Includes one 2-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: A grade of C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) or better in PSC 2001.

Concentrations

Pre-Athletic Training

BIO 1036 – Biology of the Cell

Introduces cell biology, intended for students who are not majoring in the natural sciences. Topics include the study of structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; study of the structure, function and behavior of cells; an introduction to cellular metabolism. 2 class hours.

CHM 1040 – General, Organic, and Biochemistry for Health Sciences

Introduces concepts of general, organic, and biochemistry in an integrated rather than a sequential order. Topics include the structure and function of atoms, ions and compounds, the periodic table, organic functional groups, biological macromolecules, and an introduction to metabolism. This course is required for Nursing majors and can be applied to the Exercise Physiology major.

PSC 1501 – Short Course in Physics

Selected topics from introductory physics for students who wish or need an understanding of physical concepts for their professional or personal enrichment. Some hands-on activities. Topics include force and motion, energy, waves, momentum, fluid mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism. Problem solving at the level of elementary algebra.

Internships

  • The program allows students to complete an internship, which puts their interests and objectives first
  • The internship is designed for maximum flexibility in terms of career options, location preferences and term of completion
  • Internship options range from cardiac rehabilitation to corporate wellness, to athletic performance
  • Internship sites include the Duluth-Superior and Twin Cities areas. Out of state internship opportunities are also available — previous sites include Colorado, California, South Carolina and Washington

Career Outlook

The BS in Exercise Physiology provides an excellent preparation for entry level positions across the broad field it encompasses, including cardiac rehabilitation, adult fitness, corporate wellness and athletic performance. Students are also well prepared to pursue graduate programs in physical therapy, occupational therapy, athletic training and exercise physiology.

Pair with a Language

Boost your brainpower and give yourself a competitive edge in our global economy by pairing your major with a language. St. Scholastica offers programs and courses in American Sign Language, French, German, Latin, Ojibwe, Russian and Spanish.

Meet Our Faculty

Experienced, Dedicated and Distinguished Educators

Expect to be heard, to be challenged and to be involved. St. Scholastica faculty are world-class scholars and experts in their field who bring their deep experience to online and on-campus classrooms. Our values of community, respect, stewardship and love of learning reflect our faculty’s commitment to lifting up others and celebrating our common humanity.