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The College of St. Scholastica

St. Scholastica is widely regarded for all of its educational programs, and the middle/secondary education major is no exception. As a student in the School of Education, you’ll be immersed in courses that emphasize holistic and hands-on learning.

Your courses will be taught by exceptional, well-respected professionals with years of experience as K-12 teachers that they’ll bring to your classroom. Your small class sizes will allow you to forge strong relationships with faculty as well as your fellow students, creating lifelong friendships.

Coursework will focus on the most current best practices in the classroom, from teaching methods to high-tech tools. From the day you graduate, you’ll be ready to make a real impact on the lives of your students.

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Benedictine Scholarship

All new first-year applicants to St. Scholastica will be awarded either the Benedictine Scholarship or the Access Award, upon admission to the College.

Financial Aid

100% of traditional incoming undergraduates receive some type of financial aid. The average for scholarships, grants and/or loans is $31,841.

Degree Details

Tuition

Are You Looking for a Face-to-Face (on-campus) Experience?

St. Scholastica’s longstanding commitment to inclusivity and generous financial aid packages make our world-class educational programs accessible to students from any background.

Curriculum

Program Requirements

  • Middle/Secondary (grades 5-12) and K-12 licensure requires completion of a teacher preparation major offered by one of the following departments: English, history, mathematics, biology or chemistry.
  • Spanish and music education programs result in a K-12 license.
  • The program’s curriculum is designed to comply with recent (2012) changes in licensure requirements

Here are some classes you could take as part of this major or minor. Be sure to create your course plan in consultation with your advisor.

Coursework

EDU 2160 – Content Reading &Writing Secondary

Explores content literacy within the context of multiple literacies in the middle and secondary grades. The course utilizes a balanced approach between student-centered and teacher-directed instructional methods, focusing on describing, illustrating, and applying strategies for content area literacy. Students will learn how to select and implement strategies to nurture the skills needed by their future secondary students to understand and learn content.

EDU 2600 – Instructional Planning & Management with Field Experience I

Practice effective lesson planning, questioning and communication techniques, classroom management and developing effective and professional teaching dispositions. The teacher candidate will build classroom management skills and an understanding of how these are directly related to the management of time, instruction, resources and behavior in a classroom setting. Using self-reflective practices, the teacher candidate will begin to examine personal dispositions as they relate to teaching, learning and managing a classroom. The teacher candidate will have the opportunity to implement these skills in a field placement setting. This course requires 50 hours of field experience practicum within a local school.

EDU 3600 – Education Tech – Mid/Secondary

Provides opportunity for teacher candidates to develop knowledge and strategies to effectively use and integrate technology as a tool for teaching and learning in a K-12 classroom setting. Specifically, teacher candidates will meet the needs of all K-12 learners by using inclusive technology practices that promote critical thinking and problem solving skills. Teacher candidates engage in opportunities to collect, share and assess information. Teacher candidates will practice digital awareness, interrogate digital divides and critique technology tools developing proficiencies necessary in the field of education. The teacher candidate will have the opportunity to plan for and implement these practices in a K-12 field placement setting. This course requires 50 hours of field experience practicum within a local school.

EDU 4600 – Assessment with Field Experience III

Provides opportunity for teacher candidate will develop knowledge and strategies to effectively plan for, deliver, and apply assessment processes as a tool for improving teaching and learning in a K-12 setting. Specifically, as an inquiry into the essence of the assessment process, Teacher Candidates will interrogate the purpose and process of assessment through theoretical, phenomenological, personal and experiential perspectives. Teacher Candidates will explore a brief history of assessment in education and underlying assumptions driving our assessment practices. Additionally, the forms, purposes and effects of assessment utilized in classrooms today, along with new directions being advocated, for the field of education will be researched and applied. Teacher Candidates will critique and practice inclusive assessment processes to meet the needs of all K-12 learners. The Teacher Candidate will have the opportunity to plan for, implement and reflect upon these practices in a K-12 field placement setting.

EDU 4700 – Gr. 5-12 Student Teaching

Provides students with a practical teaching experience in a local middle school or high school under the supervision of a licensed teacher. This placement includes maintaining an environment conducive to learning; planning and teaching learning units (using both long-term and daily planning tools); developing assessments to evaluate students’ learning; working with students with diverse learning needs; communicating effectively with students, parents/guardians, colleagues, and school support personnel; and participating in school activities.

EDU 4710 – Gr 5-12 Student Teaching Semnr

Helps students reflect on and deal with situations encountered in their student teaching experience. Attendance is required. Class discussions and reflections come from the daily challenges of being with students in a classroom setting. Time is also spent on discussing the job application, portfolio development, and licensure processes. Must be taken concurrently with EDU 4700.

Concentrations

Biology Teaching Preparation

NSC 3335 – Science Methods Field Experien

This experience introduces prospective teachers to the culture of the high school environment. Students observe and assist a biology or chemistry teacher, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach technology-integrated lessons and content reading strategies in their subject area. Assessment strategies are observed and practiced. Co-requisite: NSC 3333

PSC 4750 –

Chemistry Teaching Preparation

CHM` 3240 –

NSC 3333 – Science Methods

This course is designed to assist prospective middle and high school science teachers successfully conduct and manage an inquiry-based science program. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can enhance learning and motivation for students at every stage of mental development. Topics include: technology in the science classroom, inquiry techniques, investigation techniques, demonstrations, science teaching reform, and specific science programs. Prospective teachers will plan, execute, and evaluate lesson plans with their peers in a public school setting.

NSC 3335 – Science Methods Field Experien

This experience introduces prospective teachers to the culture of the high school environment. Students observe and assist a biology or chemistry teacher, interview school personnel, talk with students, and teach technology-integrated lessons and content reading strategies in their subject area. Assessment strategies are observed and practiced. Co-requisite: NSC 3333

PSC 4150 – Science, Technology and Culture

Studies the development of science and technology from prehistoric to modern times. The course emphasizes that science and technology are the creative products of human endeavor, shaped by many people over time from different cultures. The influence of geography, politics, environmental factors, religion, philosophy, and economics are examined as key factors in scientific and technological development. In turn, the influence of scientific and technological advancements upon human societies is considered. As appropriate, the original literature related to significant developments is examined to discern how scientific writing has changed over time. No prior knowledge of science content is required, but as needed, the science principles relevant to a particular development are broadly outlined to provide context.

English Teaching Preparation

CTA 1114 – Media Literacy

Analyzes the relationship between media and society through the interaction of technology, business, audiences, culture and government. Through lecture, discussion, field trips and other in-class activities, the course reviews the history and theories of mass communication as they relate to specific media.

EDM 3220 –

ENG 2000 – Introduction to English Studies

This seminar offers prospective or recently declared English majors and minors a singular opportunity for discussion with like-minded students. In this required, foundational course, you will be introduced to the skills that characterize literary studies: rigorous close reading of texts in different genres, a critical vocabulary for further work in the field, and familiarity with the major theoretical approaches to literature (New Historicist, feminist, and deconstructivist, for example) as well as the development of their practical applications. You will also learn and employ basic literary research tools. The English Department recommends that you enroll in this required gateway course as a freshman or sophomore. (Please note that this course does not fulfill any of the General Education Pathways.)

ENG 2250 –

ENG 2251 –

ENG 2252 –

ENG 3300 – Creative Writing: Fiction and Nonfiction

Explores the reading of appropriate fiction and writing of short weekly pieces and a final short story. The class includes presentations on technique. Students need not be English majors. Work from this class is often published in the St. Scholastica literary journal, Out of Words.

ENG 3301 – Creative Writing: Poetry

Explores the reading and discussion of poetry to learn technique from published poets. A final portfolio of poetry required which will include students’ choice of their best work. Students need not be English majors. Work from class is often published in the St. Scholastica literary journal, Out of Words.

ENG 3310 –

ENG 3311 –

ENG 3320 –

ENG 3321 –

ENG 4430 – English Language and Linguistics

Introduces the history of the English language, theories of grammar and major topics in linguistics. Class discussions will focus on a variety of questions: how language got started, what it is, where English comes from, how English has changed, the extent to which there is such a thing as correct English, what dialects are and how they are significant, how words and their semantic values change, what the major approaches to grammar are, how people learn language, how the mind processes language, how linguistics can help teachers and how systems of writing arose and developed.

ENG 4440 – Communication Arts/Literature Methods

Provides students with an integrated approach to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills in both middle level and high school settings. Topics include: teaching strategies that address the stages of the reading process and the writing process; teaching strategies that help students interpret and evaluate texts in a variety of ways; assessment; technology integration; selection of middle school and high school texts; lesson design and presentation; membership in professional organizations.

ENG 4440 – Communication Arts/Literature Methods

Provides students with an integrated approach to the teaching of reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing skills in both middle level and high school settings. Topics include: teaching strategies that address the stages of the reading process and the writing process; teaching strategies that help students interpret and evaluate texts in a variety of ways; assessment; technology integration; selection of middle school and high school texts; lesson design and presentation; membership in professional organizations.

ENG 4445 –

ENG 4445 –

History/Social Studies Teaching Preparation

HIS 1101 – World History I

Introduces world history from the origins of civilization to 1500. The course focuses on the societies and cultures of Eurasia: Southwest Asia (the Middle East), India, Persia, China, Greece and Rome, and Europe. Major themes include the founding and development of the world’s great religions; political ideas, institutions and practices; law and legal institutions; society and economy; war, conquest and empire; the expression and meaning of human dignity in varied contexts; and the richness and diversity of human experience and aspiration in the foundational eras of the world’s civilizations.

HIS 1102 – World History II

Introduces world history since 1500. The course surveys the societies and cultures of Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Themes include Europe’s impact on the world, modernization and tradition, imperialism and empire, the great ideologies of the modern era, and growing consciousness of human rights and world citizenship. The course traces global patterns of change and continuity, while striving to understand the particular perspectives of distinct world cultures and the meanings these cultures have given to their historical experiences.

HIS 2201 – American Indian History I

Studies political, economic, social and cultural development of the American Indian from pre-contact through conquest.

HIS 2202 –

HIS 3206 – Historiography and Historical Methods

Introduces hands-on survey of the concepts, methods, sources, and tools involved in the writing of history and in other forms of historiography. Includes a review of major historiographical trends, past and present.

HIS 3214 – The World Since 1945

Introduces world history from the end of World War II to the present. Major themes include the origins, course and end of the Cold War; the Soviet Union from Stalin to Gorbachev; China under Mao and his successors; decolonization, nationalism and the retreat from empire; the Vietnam War; Africa since independence; democracy, dictatorship and intervention in Latin America; war and peace in the Middle East; the Islamic world; human rights and the struggle for justice; the role of the United States in the contemporary world; and the meaning and responsibilities of global citizenship.

HIS 3327 – U.S. Economic History

Uses historical events as case studies for basic economic principles. Students use historical analysis to investigate economic concepts and use economic theories to analyze U.S. history. Requirements: develop critical thinking skills so that students can evaluate the influences and trends that have shaped the economic institutions and events of the United States, both past and present.

HUM 1174 – Introduction to Geography

A topical overview of physical, cultural, economic and regional geography. The course is designed for those with little or no background in the discipline. Required for SSC majors.

POL 2001 – Introduction to Political Science

Introduction to the discipline of political science and the nature of political discourse, institutions and organizations. Topics range from politics and culture to terrorism and international relations.

POL 3331 – American Government

Study of national government and development of form and functions of the federal system. Topics range from constitutional issues to public policy debates.

SSC 3900 – Social Studies Education

Introduction to social studies education in both middle school and high school settings. Topics include the nature and purposes of social studies education, the social studies curriculum, planning and designing a social studies unit and course, community resources, assessment, classroom management, the Minnesota Graduation Rule, and clinical experience in a social studies classroom. Students also spend time with teachers new to the profession and participate in mock interviews for social studies teaching positions. Pre- or co-requisite: EDU 3800.

SSC 3905 –

Spanish Teaching Preparation

ENG 2280 –

GCL 2050 – Introduction to Mexico

Focuses on understanding the social and cultural differences between the United States and Mexico. Particular attention is given to the social goals of the Mexican Revolution and how Mexico has attempted to address or ignore these goals while striving to develop its economy and society in the shadow of the world’s remaining superpower. Learning activities include readings, guest lectures by Mexican social activists and academics, excursions to sites of historical and cultural importance, reflection papers, and group discussion. The course is a required component of the Semestre en México program and is taught in English.

SPN 2101 – Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate course that deals with the more sophisticated elements of Spanish grammar and communication. All four skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing – are emphasized. Prerequisite: Placement exam, SPN 1104 or consent of instructor.

SPN 2102 – Intermediate Spanish II

Continuation of SPN 2101. Prerequisite: Placement exam, SPN 2101, or consent of instructor.

SPN 2150 – Intermediate Spanish I

Intermediate conversational Spanish. Taught as a component of the Semestre en México Program. Prerequisite: SPN 1104 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3101 – Advanced Spanish in Context I

This course is part of a two-semester in-depth examination of Spanish grammar with substantial vocabulary building. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all practiced in conjunction with cultural and situational contexts. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3102 – Advanced Spanish in Context II

This course is part of a two-semester in-depth examination of Spanish grammar with substantial vocabulary building. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all practiced in conjunction with cultural and situational contexts. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3150 – Spanish Conversation in Cuernavaca

Intensive conversational Spanish. Taught as a component of the Semestre en México Program. Prerequisite: SPN 2012 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3440 – Spanish Teaching Methods

This course is required for students pursuing a Minnesota K-12 license to teach Spanish. Explores various techniques for teaching Spanish, curriculum development, instructional planning strategies, and assessment of student progress. This course is taken concurrently with SPN 3445. Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education program.

SPN 3445 – Spanish Methods Field Experience

Provides students with a practical teaching experience in a local elementary, middle, or high school under the supervision of a licensed teacher.

SPN 3514 – Hispanic Poetry

Discover the beauty of the Spanish language through poetry. Approach and appreciate cultures of the Spanish speaking world through reading and reciting of works by contemporary and classic authors. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish.

SPN 3516 – Hispanic Short Stories

Enter literary worlds created by contemporary and classic Spanish language authors. Expand knowledge of cultural and historical contexts through short stories. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish.

SPN 3601 – Civilization: Spain

Journey through the rich history and culture landscapes of Spain. Explore major historical events, philosophical movements, political and economic changes as reflected in such cultural expressions as art, music, dance, cinema, cuisine, literature and current events. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3602 – Civilization: Latin America

Journey through the rich history and culture landscapes of Latin America. Explore major historical events, philosophical movements, political and economic changes as reflected in such cultural expressions as art, music, dance, cinema, cuisine, literature and current events. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPN 2102 or consent of instructor.

SPN 3603 – Hispanic Culture in the US

Explore the histories and cultures of Latinos in the U.S. Through a lens of cultural expressions, consider themes of migration, culture, and identity. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish.

SPN 3901 – Hispanic Women Writers

Discover the development, influences, and historical trajectory of literature written by women in Latin America. Critically analyze works from various genres as cultural and literary expressions of women in Latin American cultural contexts. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish.

SPN 3930 – Mitos y Leyendas en Español

Enter the world of myths and legends from the Spanish speaking world to explore their cultural and personal significance. Develop and practice oral storytelling techniques. Improve interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational communication skills in Spanish.

SPN 3951 – Masterpieces of Hispanic Literature

Opportunity to read some of the major literary works written in Spanish. While the content of the course changes periodically, the guiding principle is the inclusion of as much variety as possible from the different genres, historical periods, countries and sub-cultures. Students should have an advanced proficiency level of Spanish for this course; consult the instructor for a proficiency assessment.

Student Teaching

Students in the secondary education program must complete 14 credits of student teaching in nearby middle and high schools during their senior year. Excellent local schools, both public and private, are happy to work with St. Scholastica students.

Meet Our Faculty

Experienced, Dedicated and Distinguished Educators

Expect to be heard, to be challenged and to be involved. St. Scholastica faculty are world-class scholars and experts in their field who bring their deep experience to online and on-campus classrooms. Our values of community, respect, stewardship and love of learning reflect our faculty’s commitment to lifting up others and celebrating our common humanity.