Honors Program

Honors Program Graduate at Commencement

Take Charge of your Learning and Excel

The courses in the Honors Program are designed to provide challenging learning experiences, to investigate compelling and significant ideas, and to incorporate interdisciplinary work. Honors faculty ask students to become responsible for their own educations as active learners rather than passive recipients of information. They offer students the chance to perform to their highest potentials.

Embrace a Life of Learning

The honors faculty act as intellectual mentors for students in the Honors Program, serving as role models of academic rigor, critical reflection and analysis, and the integration of ideas from different disciplines. Faculty members who teach in the Honors Program also function as academic advisors to honors students. Our faculty come from disciplines across the College.

Students in the Honors Program love ideas and discussing them, not fearing intellectual debate. Honors students are able to listen to others' ideas with respect, no matter how much those ideas might conflict with personal sentiments. They desire diverse opportunities, demand the best that the College can offer, and seek improvement and revision of their own ideas through critical exchange with others. They embrace a life of learning.

Program Requirements

Qualifying for the Honors Program

If you meet two of the following three criteria upon application to The College of St. Scholastica, you will be invited by letter to interview for the Honors Program:

  • Rank in the top 15 percent of your high school graduating class
  • Post a minimum score of 26 on the ACT examination
  • Graduate from high school with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale

Interviewing for the Honors Program

A successful interview with the Honors Director is required for admission to the Honors Program. If you wish to participate in the Honors Program, but do not meet two of the three criteria for admission, you may still apply by contacting the Honors Director for an interview.

Graduating from the Honors Program

To graduate as a Webster Scholar and have an Honors designation on your transcript, you must meet the following criteria while at The College of St. Scholastica:

  • Achieve a cumulative GPA of 3.5 for graduation
  • Earn a minimum grade of "B" in all Honors courses
  • Complete 20 credits of Honors courses, eight credits of which must be upper-division (transfer students may complete fewer with the permission of the Honors Director)

Sample curriculum

Here are some classes you could take as part of this major or minor. Please note that you would not necessarily need all of these courses to fulfill a major or minor. This list doesn't include general education courses. Be sure to create your course plan in consultation with your advisor.

Course Creation Center

Expand and Collapse Coursework

Expand and Collapse HON 1112 - And Dignity for All

These are a continuation of the fall Honors sections of Dignitas, taught spring semester at the level and using the active learning techniques of the Honors Program. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program by interview with Honors Director. Honors section descriptions.

Expand and Collapse HON 2405 - The World

This course aims to give students, largely from the Upper Midwest, exposure to and an opportunity to analyze current issues from around the globe. Because the text is a British publication, it exposes students to foreign perceptions of the United States. Students gain the research skills needed to quickly get additional information on events around the world. Honors section descriptions.

Expand and Collapse HON 3777 - Honors

The upper-level topics courses are similar to those of the lower division, except that the latter are intended for junior- and senior-level students. Applications of Game Theory; Paul’s Letters; Manias, Panics, and Crashes; The Russian Revolution; Poetry Movements: Theory and Practice; Big, Fat Novels: Dostoevsky; Economics of Globalization; Conspicuous Consumption; The Death Penalty; The Science of Happiness, and 1989: The Wall Comes Down are examples of previous upper-level topics courses offered in the Honors Program.

Expand and Collapse HON 4777 - Topics

The upper-level topics courses are similar to those of the lower division, except that the latter are intended for junior- and senior-level students. Applications of Game Theory; Paul’s Letters; Manias, Panics, and Crashes; The Russian Revolution; Poetry Movements: Theory and Practice; Big, Fat Novels: Dostoevsky; Economics of Globalization; Conspicuous Consumption; The Death Penalty; The Science of Happiness, and 1989: The Wall Comes Down are examples of previous upper-level topics courses offered in the Honors Program.

Expand and Collapse HON 4885 - The Holocaust

The course involves examination of the Holocaust and its meaning for subsequent generations through an analysis of key source materials, memoirs and interpretations. Critical for an understanding of the Holocaust is the experience of victims, perpetrators and bystanders. Honors section descriptions.

For Further Information

Contact the Honors Program Director, Dr. Stephanie Johnson at sjohnson2@css.edu.

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  • "CSS honors courses have provided me a forum to develop as an intellectual, but more importantly, have also encouraged me to discuss and formulate my own perceptions on countless crucial matters of human existence."

    – Josh Robak, '17

  • Amy Blakeslee

    "Often my honors classes will be officially over and we'll still be talking, simply because the topic hasn't been resolved yet. This momentum spreads to my other classes, causing me to engage further because I now know how to push the envelope and seek out further meaning in class."

    – Amy Blakeslee, '15
    Biology major
    English minor

  • "I've loved being in the honors program. It opened me up to things I never expected I would be so interested in. I decided on a theology and religious studies minor because of the interesting honors religion classes. That would never have entered my mind without this program"

    – Megan Brennhofer, '16