2016 Conference: The Radical Reality of Relationship: Transforming Community

The College of St. Scholastica logoThe Radical Reality of Relationship: Transforming Community 2016 Conference


Sponsors

Thank you to the following sponsors for making this event possible. 

The College of St. Scholastica Department of Social Work logo

Funded in part by the Wirtanen Family Fund of the Duluth Superior Area Community Foundation.


2016 Conference: A conference highlighting diverse approaches to community transformation

On all levels, global forces of oppression are harming humans and the planet. Radical approaches to sustainable solutions are desperately needed to address the trauma, dislocation, alienation, extreme poverty, human violence and environmental destruction across all communities of our world.

  • Conference participants will experience the transformative nature of the Relational Cultural (RCT) paradigm that embodies the power of shared stories
  • Connecting across professional disciplines and communities to envision and co- create new possibilities exploring inclusive healing and community transformation
  • Collaborate and explore ways to improve education and health care
  • Address environmental and social justice issues through integrated relationship-based practices grounded in neurobiology and social action.

Conference details

When: June 9 - 12, 2016
Where: The College of St. Scholastica - Duluth Campus

Presenters

(in order of appearance)

Emily Larson, Mayor of Duluth

Mayor, Emily LarsonEmily Larson was elected Mayor of Duluth in November 2015 with 72% of the vote. She was inaugurated on January 4th, 2016.

Emily was President of the Duluth City Council prior to becoming Mayor. She served as a Commissioner on the Duluth Economic Development Authority, a board member of the Great Lakes Aquarium, Visit Duluth, and the Arrowhead Regional Development Commission, and was the Council conduit to Parks and Libraries.

Emily has an undergraduate degree from the College of St. Scholastica and a Master's Degree from the University of Minnesota Duluth. She is also a graduate of Intermedia Arts Creative Community Leadership Institute and served on the Advisory Committee that developed the Duluth Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP).

Larry Goodwin, Ph.D., President of the College of St. Scholastica

Dr. Larry Goodwin, President of The College of St. ScholasticaDr. Goodwin earned a Ph.D. in theology from the University of Chicago. His career experience includes more than a decade as an educator at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul, MN, where he served as Assistant and Associate Professor of Theology, Chair of the Department of Theology, and Acting Associate Academic Dean.  He also began a Master of Arts program in theology at St. Catherine, as well as a Weekend College. He joined St. Scholastica in 1987 as dean of faculty and also served as vice president of academic affairs before being named interim president in March 1998. He was inaugurated as the College's 11th president in October 1999. Under his leadership, enrollment and budget have more than doubled and sites have opened in St. Paul, St. Cloud and Rochester as well as in Phoenix, AZ. When he retires from St. Scholastica at the end of June, he will be the longest-serving president in the College's 104-year history.

Judith V. Jordan, Ph.D.

Judith V. Jordan, Ph. D.Judith V. Jordan is director of the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute at Wellesley College. In addition, Dr. Jordan is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She is a founding scholar of the Relational-Cultural Theory of Development which posits that we grow through and toward relationship throughout the lifespan. She has co-authored Women's Growth in Connection, Women's Growth in Diversity, The Complexity of Connection, The Power of Connection, Creating Connection. She is also the author of  Relational-Cultural Therapy sponsored by the American Psychological Association.  She received a commendation  for outstanding achievement in her Ph.D. graduate program at Harvard University and was given  the Massachusetts Psychological Association career award for contributions to the field of psychology. In 2010, she was awarded the Distinguished Psychologist Award given to one north American Psychologist each year by the psychotherapy division of the APA.

Dr Jordan has devoted her professional life to clinical practice and the development of a new understanding of what leads to growth, creativity and wellbeing.  She has published over forty original reports, and twenty-five chapters, and been co-author for three books. Relational Cultural Theory, now fully supported by current discoveries in neuroscience. The practice of mutual empathy is directly related to the promotion of social justice, as is the belief that growth fostering connections are at the core of human development.  By carefully studying people's lives and struggles, she is creating new models of human development which hopefully will help transform the destructive social impact of competition, hyper-individualism, racism, sexism, heterosexism, and classism. While most of her early work arose in the context of the practice of psychotherapy, increasingly she is applying this work to organizations and to social change.

Maureen Walker, Ph.D.

Maureen Walker, Ph.D.Maureen Walker is Director of Program Development at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute of the Stone Center at Wellesley College, as well as the Director of MBA Support Services at Harvard Business School. In addition, she is a licensed psychologist with an independent practice in psychotherapy and multicultural consultation in Cambridge, MA. 

The author of several papers in the Stone Center Works in Progress Series, Dr. Walker has written several journal articles and textbook chapters. She is co-editor of two books: How Connections Heal and The Complexity of Connection.  In addition to her clinical practice and publications, Maureen conducts workshops nationally on developing relational intelligence in organizations, empowering relational leadership, practicing culturally competent psychotherapy, and connecting spirituality and social activism. Other teaching and publication projects involve exploring linkages between social-cultural identities and relational development, the impact of disordered power relations on mental health, as well as the interface of faith, social justice, and relational practice.

Amy Banks, M.D.

Amy Banks, M.D.Amy Banks, M.D., has devoted her career to understanding the neurobiology of relationships. In addition to her work at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI), she was an instructor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. She is the first person to bring relational-cultural theory together with neuroscience and is the foremost expert in the combined field. Dr. Banks co-edited The Complete Guide to Mental Health for Women, published by Beacon Press in 2004. She has written numerous articles on the treatment of childhood trauma including a popular manual, PTSD, Relationships and Brain Chemistry, published as a project report at the Stone Center, Wellesley College.

She is the creator of the C.A.R.E. Program, an easy to use, practical guide that helps clinicians and laypeople assess the quality of their relationships and strengthen their neural pathways for connection. Dr. Banks has a private practice in Lexington, MA, that specializes in relational psychopharmacology and therapy for people who suffer from chronic disconnection. She has spoken throughout the country on "The Neurobiology of Relationship" and has an ongoing passion to spread the message that we are hardwired for connection.

Karen T. Craddock, Ph.D.

Karen T. Craddock, Ph.D. Karen T. Craddock is an Applied Psychologist, Trainer and Principal Researcher whose more than 20 year study and practice concentrates on the socio-cultural context of human development and relational frameworks, particularly within the fields of Health and Education. Her exploration of psychosocial functioning, parenting, motherhood, maternal/child mental health and disparities, social-emotional learning and neuroscience focuses on promoting wellness, preventing violence, building healthy relationship and cultivating connection toward transformative change. Her transdisciplinary interests link across women, family and cultural studies, especially among African-American and Native American communities. Karen is faculty and lead scholar of Relational-Cultural Theory and Social Action at the Jean Baker Miller Training Institute (JBMTI) Wellesley Centers for Women, as well as founder and president of KCollaborative Connections, a relationship-based consultation practice providing services across multiple sectors and informed by models of collective impact and social capital development. 

Dr. Craddock is editor/author of Black Motherhood(s): Contours, Contexts and Considerations (Demeter) and developer of the analytical framework "Profiles of Resistance to Marginalization" examining the psycho-social impact of societal stressors and varied strategies to resist them. Among her advisory roles, academic and civic endeavors, she leads outreach and research development for the Sodina project (The Avielle Foundation) a national initiative that is cultivating pathways and opportunities for healing and connection through the power of shared story and engagement among a diverse range of people and communities who have suffered loss due to violence to honor loved ones, map both tragedy and triumph, and reveal broad impacts and possibilities. She is fueled by her desire to collaboratively construct bridges between innovative thinking, creative expression and effective action that support and catalyze sharp awareness, vibrant compassion and sustainable networks that enhance and enrich all lives. Dr. Craddock earned her Ed.M. at Harvard University and Ph.D. at Tufts University.

Harriet L. Schwartz, Ph.D.

Harriet L. Schwartz, Ph.D.Harriet L. Schwartz, Ph.D., serves as JBMTI's Lead Scholar for Education as Relational Practice. She is associate professor of psychology and counseling at Carlow University in Pittsburgh and mentors students in research methods at Antioch University where she earned her PhD in Leadership and Change. She has authored and co-authored several journal articles primarily in the areas of teaching as relational practice and qualitative research methods. She also edited "Interpersonal Boundaries in Teaching and Learning" published by Jossey-Bass in 2012 and is currently co-editing a new monograph on teaching and emotion.

Connie Gunderson, Ph.D.

Connie Gunderson, Ph.D.Connie Gunderson, Ph.D. is associate professor at the College of St. Scholastica. Having completed her undergraduate studies at the College of St. Scholastica, she moved and worked in Germany until 2012. She completed her MSW at the Alice Salomon Hochschule in Berlin, and received her Ph.D. at the University of Bremen. Dr. Gunderson has worked in the field of social work for over 30 years. As an associate professor, her areas of scholarly expertise include human trafficking, gender studies, and international social work research. As a relational cultural therapist, her clinical foci has been on women, trauma and addiction, and addressing the needs of families. As a researcher, she has completed studies of human trafficking in Germany and the European Union. She has published books and articles addressing social issues such as human trafficking, diversity, and gender. Dr. Gunderson maintains international teaching and advisory partnerships with diverse universities and colleges in Europe.

Schedule

Download schedule (pdf)

All events on Thursday will be held in CSS Mitchell Auditorium unless otherwise indicated.
All events from Friday to Sunday will be held in Somers Lounge unless otherwise indicated.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Arrival, Registration, Exhibits/Art/Poster presentation
Mitchell Auditorium

1 p.m.
Welcome and Benediction
Welcome: The Honorable Emily Larson, Mayor of Duluth

1:30 p.m.
Opening Remarks: Inclusive Excellence
Larry Goodwin, Ph.D, President of the College of St. Scholastica
Inclusive Excellence-the idea that academic excellence is best realized in a community that is diverse and inclusive-is central to our mission as a Catholic Benedictine learning community. The College of St. Scholastica demonstrates hospitality to all, respects all persons as children of God, and creates community that values the uniqueness of the individual and honors diverse opinions and experiences. This is fundamental to who we are, informing perceptions of ourselves and our Benedictine community as we recognize our responsibility and commitment to support students, staff and faculty in successfully participating in a diverse and global world.

2 p.m.
Keynote Address: The Radical Reality of Relationship: The Power of Connection
Judith V. Jordan, Ph.D.
In this talk, Dr. Jordan will provide an overview of Relational-Cultural Theory, its beginnings, development and current applications. When we put relationships at the center of human development, it changes everything. We face the following dilemma: we are hardwired to thrive in connection but taught to function independently, to stand on our own feet. Unrealistic expectations for self-sufficiency create destructive stress. Supporting interdependence and empathic responsiveness to one another contributes to healthier individuals and communities. RCT calls for a re-examination of some of the core negative beliefs about human nature, uncovers positive underpinnings for human interactions and thus provides a basis for hope. An empathic world is a hopeful world. Together we can create radical and life sustaining empathy.

2:45 p.m.
Break

3-4 p.m.
Panel Discussion: Relational Cultural Theory: Active in the World
The panel will address how RCT is currently being integrated into health care and psychotherapy, education and organizational practice, environmental and social action.

4:30-5:30 p.m.
Exhibits, Art and Posters
Benedictine Commons

5:30-7:30 p.m.
Dinner on your own

7:30 p.m.
Community Event: Disruptive Empathy: Cultivating Healing and Hope for our Troubled Times
Presenter: Maureen Walker, Ph.D
Location: Mitchell Auditorium, The College of St. Scholastica

Friday, June 10, 2016

7:30-8:15 a.m.
Yoga
Burns Wellness Center

8:30 a.m.
Welcome and Benediction

9 a.m.
Morning Session Presentation: Transforming Community: The Power of Mutual Empathy
Presenter: Judith V. Jordan, Ph.D.
Empathy, practiced in a context of mutual respect, has a profound impact on social functioning. Some, like Stephen Hawking, have suggested that empathy is the only path to the preservation of the planet. When we empathize across difference we help to break down the walls of mistrust and competition that are rampant in a highly individualistic culture. This talk will focus on how to build social organizations that embody mutual empathy that lead to more social cohesion, less extreme economic inequality, less violence and greater creativity.

9:30-11:30 a.m.
Dialogue Groups
The Power of Shared Stories in Education, Health Care, Social Action, Neuroscience, and the Environment

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Transforming Community
Summary of Shared Stories

12:30-1:30 p.m.
Lunch on your own
Exhibits, Art and Posters
Benedictine Commons

1:30-2 p.m.
Afternoon Session Presentation: Exclusion & Inclusion: Resisting Marginalization & Building Connection using a Social Action and Relational Science Perspective
Co-Presenters: Amy Banks, M.D and Karen T. Craddock, Ph.D.
Relational Neuroscience has revealed that the pain of social exclusion and marginalization is every bit as real and as distressing as the pain of a physical illness or injury. What might this mean in a society that routinely stratifies individuals and whole groups of people? This didactic, interactive and experiential session will introduce "STOP", a new model for relational growth and social justice created by Karen Craddock and Amy Banks.

2-4 p.m.
Dialogue Groups
The Power of Shared Stories in Education, Health Care, Social Action, Neuroscience, and the Environment

4-4:30 p.m.
Transforming Community
Summary of Shared Stories

4:30-5:30 p.m.
Exhibits/Art/Poster Presentations
Benedictine Commons

5:30
American Indian Women's Drum Celebration with Oshkii Giizhik
Location TBD

Saturday, June 11, 2016

7:30-8:15 a.m.
Yoga
Burns Wellness Center

9:00 a.m.
Morning Session Presentation: Assessment and Supervision as Relational Practice
Presenter: Harriet L. Schwartz, Ph.D.
How do we stay in connection and convey mattering even when delivering critical feedback? In this session, we will explore this question as it relates to assessing student work, providing clinical supervision, and conducting employee evaluations. Key strategies covered will include exploring the meanings of assessment and supervision, managing triggers and disconnections, and recognizing emotions (our own and those of the person whose work is being assessed). Participants will identify take-away strategies to balance challenge and support in the assessment/supervision process and also to enhance their own resilience in this aspect of their work.

9:30-11:30 a.m.
Dialogue Groups
The Power of Shared Stories in Education, Health Care, Social Action, Neuroscience, and the Environment

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Transforming Community
Summary of Shared Stories (in Somers Lounge)

12:30-1:30 p.m.
Lunch on your own

1:30-2 p.m.
Afternoon Session Presentation: It's Not About Checking a Box: Confronting the Claims of Post-racialism
Presenter: Maureen Walker, Ph.D
One of the more insidious myths of post-racialism is that conversations about race and racism have no legitimacy in the cultural narrative of 21st century. Such a claim obscures the complex relational dynamics of modern racialized culture and functions to constrict out awareness, thus limiting our capacity to think, feel and act with clarity and purpose. In this seminar Maureen Walker, Ph.D. highlights some of the competencies required to recast the terms of the conversation, allowing participants to leave the program more empowered to engage the complexities of racialized experience with greater clarity and compassion.

2-4 p.m.
Dialogue Groups
The Power of Shared Stories in Education, Health Care, Social Action, Neuroscience, and the Environment

4-4:30 p.m.
Transforming Community
Summary of Shared Stories

4:30-5:30 p.m.
Relational Education Game created by CSS MSW students

5:30 p.m.
Dinner

7:30 p.m.
Fireside music, conversation and Marshmellow Roast at CSS
Science front lawn

Sunday, June 12, 2016

8:30 a.m.
Welcome and Benediction

9 a.m.
Morning Session Presentation: Transforming Community: The Power of Shared Stories
Presenter: Connie Gunderson, Ph.D
Jean Baker Miller once said, "The source of hope lies in believing that one has or can move toward a sense of connection with at least one person. Whenever we encourage and support connection, even after horrendous disconnections, we inspire hope in ourselves and others." In this talk, we will share stories of strength, resilience, and hope as we work to transform community to provide sanctuary for those in need and places for growth and wellbeing for all of life.

9:30-11:30 a.m.
Small and large group dialogue to create an action plan to move forward as a transformative community.

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Final Summary and Farewells