Curriculum | B.A. Organizational Behavior

Program length

This program can be completed in fewer than three years. Students can enroll in eight credits per term (class two nights per week), and there are six terms per year. Of course, you're free to work through the program at your own pace.

Any applicable transfer credits will shorten this timeline.

Required classes

The Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Behavior requires students to complete 128 credits to graduate. All students are required to complete our General Education requirements.

Most students who have earned an Associate of Arts degree from a Minnesota community college that participates in the MNSCU Minnesota Transfer Curriculum have completed the College's general education requirements, with the exception of Religious Studies and a Writing Intensive course. Speak with an admissions representative for an evaluation of your previous college coursework.

Course Creation Center

Expand and Collapse Required Courses

Expand and Collapse MGT 3150 - MGT Communications: Written

Emphasis on the writing process as adapted to the management situation. Students complete a series of writing assignments including letters, memos, proposals, problem-solving reports and informational reports and procedures, with an emphasis on audience adaptation, clarity of purpose, adequacy of support and correct format. Students will be introduced to writing for electronic media. Students must be juniors and have some professional experience before enrolling. Prerequisite: ENG 1110 or competency.

Expand and Collapse MGT 3550 - Organizational Behavior

Explores the behavior of people within organizations in terms of the factors that most influence it. These include factors related to individuals, groups and the larger organization system. The course relies heavily on experiential learning as a means of teaching students how to apply lessons in organizational settings. Prerequisites: junior status or permission of instructor.

Expand and Collapse MGT 3560 - Organization Development

Introduces students to the theories and practice of organization development and how organizations plan and facilitate the change process. Emphasis will be on understanding the drivers of change, stages of transition management, dealing with resistance to change, organizational culture, and change agent skills. Cases and work experience will be used to highlight challenges.

Expand and Collapse MGT 4150 - Management Communication: Oral

Covers a wide array of subjects related to communicating in organizations, including: interpersonal communication, upward/downward/lateral communication, organizational structure, office and plant layout, effective business presentations, leadership in business meetings, interviewing and telephone usage.

Expand and Collapse MGT 4261 - Team Development

Examines the role of teams in organizations. It covers the decision to use teams, characteristics of effective teams, team building, styles of interaction, project planning, conflict, and evaluation. Students form teams to work on tasks and use them as a laboratory for understanding and changing team processes.

Expand and Collapse MGT 4262 - Training and Development

Provides an introduction to the function of training and development in organizations. It provides a theoretical and practical foundation for students conducting training activities including needs assessment, learning styles ,curriculum and program design, use of instructional media and techniques, and evaluation.

Expand and Collapse PHL 3354 - Management Ethics

Study of the application of ethical principles to problems encountered in management. Confrontation of the problems is preceded by inquiry into the nature of human interaction in general and management in particular. Other topics include: obligations of the manager to a number of clients or spheres of responsibility, including employees and clients of the organization; rights and obligations of employers and employees; and discrimination, liability and advertising.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3216 - Personality

Origins, explanations, assessment and modification of personality as described by major theories of personality, with attention to ethical practices. This course includes a focus on applications to coping and adjustment of the healthy personality, as well as applications for helping individuals recover normal functioning. Emphasis is on the interaction of the individual's personality traits with specific situations as the individual attempts to adapt to the environment. Active learning components include theory-based problem-solving and responding to a variety of personality instruments. Prerequisite: one course in general or developmental psychology.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3327 - Social Psychology

Explores the history, content, methods, and applications of social psychology as a scientific discipline. Topics include social psychological research methods, the importance of the person and the environment in predicting social behavior, errors in social judgments and decision making, attribution theories, obedience to authority, conformity, group processes, prejudice and discrimination, aggression, altruism, interpersonal attraction and sexuality, and conflict and peacemaking. The most current applications of social psychology to law, the health professions, the clinic, business, and politics are discussed, with special emphasis on connections to students' own lives. Prerequisite: one course in general or developmental psychology.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3328 - Behavior Management

Examines the use of scientifically established principles of learning to promote behavior change. The use of operant and classical conditioning methods and their applications for a variety of human conditions are covered. Special emphasis is on the application of behavioral methods for health improvement and for stress management. Topics include positive and negative reinforcement, punishment, escape and avoidance, reinforcement schedules, modeling, desensitization, progressive relaxation. Prerequisite: one course in general or developmental psychology.

Expand and Collapse PSY 3330 - Research Methods

Overview of research process designed for upper-division students interested in reading and/or conducting research. Topics include logic of scientific research, types of research, phases of a research study, designing experimental and correlational studies, sampling, quantitative and qualitative methods for collecting data, evaluation and writing of research reports, and ethical issues.

Expand and Collapse WGS 2231 - Cultural Anthropology

Comparative and contextual study of the diversity and similarity in human behaviors and sociocultural adaptations as these occur throughout the world. This course studies anthropological concepts as tools of analysis in understanding culture, powerful "roles" of culture, cultural patterns and factors leading to cultural change.

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